When is the next lunar and solar eclipse?

According to international time, UTC, and calculations from NASA engineers, the next lunar eclipse is on September 16, 2016 and the next solar eclipse is September 1, 2016.

The following dates may vary around one day due to the timezone of each country. More information about the exact date and time particular to a country in the links below.

Eclipses in 2016

Calculations show that 2 lunar eclipses and 2 solar eclipses will occur in 2016 with the following dates:

  1. Total Solar Eclipse March 9, 2016
  2. Penumbral Lunar Eclipse March 23, 2016
  3. Annular Solar Eclipse September 1, 2016

    Annular solar eclipse 2016-09-01 This is an animated image which shows the shadow of the moon and its path on the map during the solar eclipse. Only the regions shaded by the moon may view this Annular solar eclipse. The date and time displayed in this image are international date and time, therefore, they might not apply to your country. However, to know the date and exact time of Annular solar eclipse in your country, you can see Eclipse schedule in United States. (Click on image to enlarge it).

  4. Penumbral Lunar Eclipse September 16, 2016

    penumbral lunar eclipse 2016-09-16 This image shows the global map with two regions: the shaded region where you can not see the lunar eclipse, and the blank region, where it can be seen. The image details the type of eclipse, the magnitude of the penumbra and umbra, Saros series to which this eclipse belongs, among other data. The date and time displayed in this image are international date and time, therefore, they might not apply to your country. However, to know the date and exact time of penumbral lunar eclipse in your country, you can see Eclipse schedule in United States. (Click on the image to enlarge it).

Eclipses in 2017

Calculations show that 2 lunar eclipses and 2 solar eclipses will occur in 2017 with the following dates:

  1. Penumbral Lunar Eclipse February 11, 2017
  2. Annular Solar Eclipse February 26, 2017
  3. Partial Lunar Eclipse August 7, 2017
  4. Total Solar Eclipse August 21, 2017

Eclipse of the Moon: To produce a lunar eclipse, total or partial, the three celestial bodies, Sun, Earth, Moon, should be in a straight line or very close to that position and therefore the Moon should be in opposition (full moon), and fully or partially penetrate into the shadow of the Earth.

Solar Eclipse: A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon lines up between the Sun and the Earth so we can sometimes see from Earth as the moon obscures the Sun completely or partially. While lunar eclipses are independent of the position of the observer, the solar eclipses occur only in particular areas of the Earth.

The following image is a world map with the path of every total solar eclipse, annular solar eclipse and hybrid solar eclipse visible from Earth during the years 2001-2020. Each eclipse path is identified by the calendar date at the instant of greatest eclipse (Universal Time). The asterisk symbols are where the position of greatest eclipse occurs, they are near the middle section of each path. The calendar date is usually placed as close as possible to this point. Also, please have in mind the following:

  1. The total eclipses are marked in blue.
  2. The dates of total eclipses are always in bold style.
  3. The annular eclipses are marked in red.
  4. The hybrid eclipses are marked in magenta (except for the total eclipse sections of path which are blue).
  5. The dates of annular and hybrid eclipses are always in italic style.
  6. The regions of partial eclipse visibility are not shown in this map since it would make them too difficult to read.

Other Links

Content last updated on 2013-05-26